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SENTRY JOURNAL » D-Day, June 6 1944, Operation Overlord, World War II » June 6, 1944: D-Day

June 6, 1944: D-Day

Its code name was Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of occupied France on June 6, 1944.  The Allied Supreme Commander, General Dwight D. Eisenhower had originally planned the invasion for June 5, 1944; however bad weather delayed actions until the following day.  

It was a total force effort with forces from Canada and Britian making up an Eastern task force responsible for establishing three beachheads and American forces making up the Western task force responsible for establishing two beachheads on the Normandy shores.  A combined 820 aircraft carrying paratroopers, 5,000 ships and craft, 170,000 troops and over 1,000 bombers to soften up German defenses would launch a coordinated attack on Normandy on June 6. You can read about the entire battle here.  It is estimated  that a combined total over 550,000 troops from both sides were either killed, wounded, or missing.  American forces carried the brunt of the casualties for the Allied forces at a 135,000.

Below is a short clip from the History channel of D-Day.

That was 66 years ago today.  I think about how these men were called upon to save a world during a time when the world was on fire.  They were far from their homes and families fighting in a distant land to secure our liberties and freedoms.  Many made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedoms; we would be wise to remember this and ask ourselves how much are we are willing to sacrifice to preserve liberty and freedom for future generations?  Are we willing to stand up and save our Republic; a Republic that like the world 66 years ago is on fire.

Think about it.

Liberty forever, freedom for all.

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Filed under: D-Day, June 6 1944, Operation Overlord, World War II

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Comments
  • Trestin Meacham June 6, 2010 at 5:58 AM

    This was was one of America's finest and most tragic events. These guys set the standard for everyone that has worn the uniform after. No expression of gratitude is enough.

  • John Carey June 6, 2010 at 9:07 AM

    We need to remember this date and the sacrifices they made for us. Thanks for the comments Trestin.

  • Conservative Scalawag June 6, 2010 at 1:32 PM

    Good job on thanking the WWII vet, and sad that he was shocked – he should be thanked everyday for what he and millions like him did to preserved liberty in Europe and the rest of the world.

    In fact, I just got back from my local VWF where I dropped off some donuts and coffee for them. Told the vets thanks that served – the few that were there, thanks for their service.

  • John Carey June 6, 2010 at 5:59 PM

    Thanks CS.

  • Matt June 6, 2010 at 8:40 PM

    We can't forget about this event, or the war, or the reasons we were there, or the lessons that WWII (should have)taught us.

    John, I'm glad you asked that final question. In the lead-up to the war, Americans were deeply split as to whether or not we should get involved at all. However, when we were attacked, everyone pulled together. There was only one vote against the war in Congress.

    Now, even if another 9-11, or worse, occurred, I fear that a shockingly large number of Americans would side with the attackers. That saddens and outrages me. Most people my age have grandfathers and other relatives that served in WWII. We owe it to their sacrifice to preserve our Republic.